Elvish day?

There’s something funny going on today, I see lots of people dressed as elves in green clothing drinking some black, apparently intoxicating, stuff from pint glasses. Anyhow, we should be swinging down to Tracy’s Willy’s place for some drinks, because it’s Friday night, nothing special.

Job hunt’s not going well; at the job centre yesterday, the “helpful” suspicious interrogator looked hard at his keyboard and found me a “job”. I shall describe it to you forthwith:

Business Support Manager
Minimum of 5 years administration experience in public sector. Proven experience of leading and managing a team. Must be Educated (yes, with a capital E) to graduate standard.
£33,110 p.a.

Much as I like the numbers, I told him no inconsequential number of times in no uncertain terms that I was fresh and wet-behind-the-ears out of business school. So he says, “yes yes, apply to that one!” Bloody quota-filling, chair-warming, paper-pushing public sector employees. He wouldn’t last long enough to refill his coffeee or clip on his hands-free headset (what the fuck’s that about, Mr. “Donald Trump”) in private enterprise.

Just finished reading John Steinbeck’s ‘Of mice and men’ as part of my “Naz learns the classics” drive. I just now managed to find a copy of the Beeb’s “Big read” list of April 2003 and intend to read as many as possible, apart from other good ‘uns not mentioned (and avoiding the thick ones (hello Tolstoy!) as long as possible). ‘Of mice and men’ comes in at a respectable No. 52. Even better, it comes in at a very respectable 100 or so pages!!! A really good read, reminded me a bit of Catch 22 in the use of American dialogue, very simple story that somehow engrosses you. Must read.

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5 Comments

  1. victor

     /  18 March, 2006

    hey naz, any more similarities between ‘of mice and men’ and ‘catch 22’?
    I just happen to think catch is the best book ever written (it kicks ass!) so I’d definitely read something similar.

    Reply
  2. As a general rule, I tend to avoid those smarmy-arse I’m-oh-so-superior-coz-I-have-the-power-to-find-you-a-shitty-job-stacking-shelves-down-the-local-Tesco type of people! You;re better off doin it online. 😉
    As for the books, I’ve recently discovered books on te GCSE syllabus are much more entertaining than the ‘grown-up’stuff! You should take a look at Holes by Louis Sachaar and Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo. Great stuff!

    Reply
  3. Cant believe the type of books that are ranked as top 10 by the public, I wouldnt consider any of them. It doesnt teach me anything in real life. Books should be resourceful I think!! Or am I being too conventional???

    Reply
  4. V: I don’t think the film did/could do it justice though. Apparently Steinbeck has an even more famous book called “The grapes of wrath”
    S: I think part of the BBC’s “Big Read” drive was to get more people reading books; therefore the slant could ahve been towards the entertainment value of books, and not necessarily/merely the educational content. Some people read just for pleasure, you know 😛
    R: When I asked a librarian for a book I had read as a child, she said nobody reads those any more. When I suggested children were reading less, she said that actually they’re devouring books by some new authors I haven’t heard of. Generation gap or what?

    Reply
  5. Well, in my day, we would be devouring Chaucer by age 10. 🙂

    Reply

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